Kulith Idli/ Horsegram Idli and the Giveaway winner….

Thank you dear readers for participating in the Masala Dabba giveaway. Based on the response it appears that many people are impressed with the ying yang version of the Masala Dabba designed and created by GitaDini. 

As promised I did a lucky draw with help from random.org and my 7 year old. Without much ado the lucky winner is “Triveni Limye”. I have sent her an email and she has gladly responded back. Congratulations Triveni, hope you enjoy the sleek masala box which you will receive shortly.

And now off to today’s recipe of making Idli using Kulith/ Horse gram. Traditional Idli is quite common in our house. But then I love making tweaks and adding other nutritious lentils, beans and making it much more nutritious. So I tried making Idli by using Horse gram along with the usual Urad daal. 

There is no much difference in taste with the addition of Horse Gram in this batter as compared to the usual idli (provided correct fermentation is done).  However if you are not used to eating brown idli or having for the first time, then you may feel a slight after taste than that of regular old idli. But this can be overcome by serving this along with good chutney or a side dish. 

Ingredients

  • ½ cup horsegram/kulith
  • 1/2 cup urad daal (split and de-husked)
  • 1 ¼ cup idli rava
  • Tablespoon of cooked rice/ poha (beaten rice) [soaked]
  • 1 tsp methi 

Preparation:

  • In several changes of changes clean the urad daal, horse gram and methi seeds.
  • Soak the horsegram. urad daal along with methi overnight (6-8 hours) in enough water. 
  • The next morning or after 8 hours soak the idli rava in water for 1-2 hours.
  • Grind the urad daal, methi with cooked rice/poha and required amount of water to make a paste. 
  • Do not add too much water; the water should be sufficient just so that the mixer/grinder motor runs smoothly.
  • When I notice some small fine bubbles (maybe about 4-5 of them) on the top I stop the grinding. (This is optional and may not be the case all the time).
  • Drain the water completely from the soaked rava and add this urad daal paste thoroughly with washed idli rava. This should be as thick as possible.
  • Keep it aside to ferment for at least 8 hours (14 hours in winter atleast).

Method:

  • After the batter is fermented, add salt and water and mix the idli batter well. The batter should not be very thick. (it needs to be of pouring consistency)
  •  Grease the idli stand and pour batter in each of the container in the idli stand.
  • Steam this in a pressure cooker without whistle/weight for 15 minutes.
  • Take the idlis out and serve along with chutney. Serve hot.

Dali Ambat (Konkani Coconut daal)

Daal is an important part of our everyday meal. Any one type of daal is a regular, be it daali thoy, daal tadka, rasam or sambhar etc and our meal is not complete without it. Now these are all non-coconut, daal rich dishes which does not require grinding. However on occasion I make coconut based daal like Kootu or this Konkani daal curry called Daali Ambat which definitely requires grinding a masala. 

Ambat in Konkani refers to a coconut curry in which the seasoning is made of onions. Daali Ambat is daal based coconut curry in which has seasoning of onions. 

My mom makes this frequently however she does not add any vegetables to the curry, while my ma-in-law makes this by adding plenty of vegetables. Either way it is warm and comforting.

Ingredients:

  • 3/4 cup Toor daal
  • 1/2 cup fresh/frozen shredded coconut
  • 1 tsp coriander seeds
  • 4-5 dried red chillies
  • 1 Tbsp tamarind/ tamarind extract from lemon sized ball (soaked in water)
  • Salt to taste
  • A pinch asafetida/hing
  • 1 cup chopped vegetables of choice (potato + carrot +peas+ cauliflower) [optional]

Seasoning

  • 1 small onion (chopped)
  • 2-3 dried red chillies (cut into 2-3 pieces)
  • 4-5 curry leaves
  • 1 Tbsp oil 

Method: 

  • Pressure cook the daal in water for 3 whistles and set aside.
  • Boil the vegetables along with salt in sufficient amount of water separately either in the microwave or the stovetop. Make sure it is not overcooked. Keep aside.
  • In a small pan, heat oil and roast the red chillies and coriander seeds.
  • Now make the coconut masala, by grinding coconut along with roasted red chillies, salt, tamarind, water and roasted coriander seeds. The masala should be made into a very fine paste. Add more water if required.
  • Heat a sauce pan and add the coconut paste, cooked daal together. Boil until the raw smell of coconut is gone. Check for taste and adjust the seasonings if required.
  •  In the meanwhile heat oil in a small pan (use the same one for roasting redchillies and coriander seeds). Add the chopped onion, curry leaves, red chillies and cook unitl the onion turns light brown.
  •  Put this tadka over the boiling daal, switch of the gas and cover with lid. Serve hot with rice or rotis.  

Banana Fritters/ Kele Mulik or Mulka

Mulka or Mulik as they are called in Konkani are fritters made from fruits like jackfruit and bananas. In most Konkani households they are usually made out of jackfruit and are called as ponsa mulka. But we make them using ripe bananas as well using the same procedure.  Also since it is difficult to find good quality of jackfruit here in the US, I resort to making them using bananas whenever I have some craving for them. 

These are perfect if you want to have something sweet and have some over ripe bananas to be used. Crunchy on the outside and soft on the inside with dominant flavors of cooked banana it makes a good snack. If you do not want to deep fry and prefer low fat version then you can try the banana appe/paniyaram using the Aebleskiver pan. You can also try the pan fried version of bananas, if they are not overly ripe.

Serves 3-4

Ingredients

  • 2 over ripe bananas
  • 3/4 cup sooji/semolina/rava
  • 1 Tbsp wheat flour
  • 2-3 Tbsp powdered jaggery/ substitute with sugar if you cannot find jaggery
  • ½ tsp baking soda
  • ¼ tsp cardamom powder
  • A pinch of salt
  • Oil for deep frying

Method 

  • Making batter: Peel the banana and mash it finely in a bowl so that there are no lumps.
  • Now add the jaggery, wheat flour and rava little by little and mix so that it forms a thick paste. Add the cardamom powder, salt and baking soda and make the batter ready.
  • Frying: Heat oil on medium in a thick bottomed pan sufficient enough to deep fry.
  • Check to make sure that the oil has reached the correct temperature, by putting in small amount of batter. If there is a sizzle that means the oil is ready.
  • Note: These fritters begin to dark very quickly, so make sure the oil is not too hot.
  • Take about a tablespoon of the batter and put it in the oil. Add about 4-5 depending on the size of the pan at the same time.
  • After about 20-30 secs turn them around, making sure all sides get cooked evenly.
  • Transfer them to a plate with absorbent paper so that the extra oil drains. Continue the above process with the remaining batter.
  • This can be eaten as is and forms a wonderful accompaniment with tea or coffee.