Easy Coconut Rice Recipe, South Indian style

coconut rice
In India coconut is one of the most common offerings to God.  Since is considered ‘sreshtha’ (superior) and auspicious it is offered as a way of prayer. It is first de-husked, broken along with the shell and then offered. After that the coconut is treated as part of prasadam and is consumed by making variety of eatables. 

Being a Konkani, coconut is a part of our everyday food. The morning ritual starts by breaking a coconut offering it to God and making some preparations out of it. There are lots of recipes sweet, savory and curries that use coconut. In our family Coconut rice is usually prepared during festivals along with array of other delicious preparations. My ma-in-law uses coconut oil for this rice and that adds a distinct taste to the rice. 

This is easy to prepare and gets done in no time at all (especially if you have shredded coconut on hand). You can prepare this dish if you have left over rice as well.


  • 1 cup of raw rice (cooked so that the grains are separate, I do not use Basmati for this).
  • ¾ cup shredded coconut (add more or less depending on taste) [use fresh rather than frozen]
  • 2 tsp urad daal/ split black gram
  • 2-3 dried red chillies (broken into 3 pieces)
  • Asafetida a pinch
  • 1 tsp mustard seeds
  • 5-6 curry leaves
  • Few cashews
  • Oil (preferably coconut oil)
  • 1 Tbsp chopped coriander/cilantro (optional)
  • salt to taste


  • Cook the rice separately so that the grains are separated and fluffy. Take a big plate and spread out the cooked rice, sprinkle salt and little oil onto it.
  • Take a big pan and heat oil (preferably coconut, else use any oil) and add the mustard seeds. After they splutter add the urad daal, asafetida, cashews, broken red chillies, curry leaves and cook until the urad daal turns light brown.
  • Add the shredded coconut to this and stir for 2-3 minutes until it gets the toasted aroma.
  • Finally add the cooked rice and mix for another2-3 minutes. Mix with wooden spatula so that the rice does not get broken. Add the chopped coriander and check for seasonings and serve hot.

Lemon Dill Rice

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We had eaten a Dill Rice at a Mediterranean restaurant when we were on a vacation far east (no not that far east a little to the westJ), and that taste had stuck onto us for a long time. It was a simple rice recipe, nothing complicated but the way the rice and dill was cooked appealed to our taste buds. It must have been exhaustion, hunger, the timing we are not sure but anyways the taste and memory lingered on for days to come. 

Anyway we found some fresh dill last week and DH remembered the Dill Rice we had at the restaurant. He offered to give it a try and make his own.  So this is DH’s recipe that he made last weekend for our lunch. This is more of an Indanised version of the one that we had at the Mediterranean restaurant. This rice had a lemon taste with mild flavor of Dill in the background, spiced with the green chillies balanced by the sweet taste of beans and cooked onion. This is more like an extension of our very own Chitranna with the addition of dill and beans!

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Raw Mango Rice (MavinaKayi Chitranna)

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This Raw Mango Rice called as ‘Mavinakayi Chitranna’ in Kannada is a variation of the usual Mango Rice recipe that I have posted here. In the latter version, all the ingredients are mixed and cooked over the stove top; where as in this version, the cooked rice is mixed along with raw mango paste and then aptly seasoned. Of course, for this version the seasoning plays a very important role and needs to be as strong as possible. This is achieved by using good asafetida, fresh curry leaves and good dried chillies. 

I got this recipe from my MIL who happened to see this in a cookery program on TV. She passed along this recipe last week. Since I had a raw mango, I gave it a try this week and we loved the taste. The tanginess for this rice comes from the raw mango and there is no need to add lemon juice to this. 

I have also posted a basic variation of Chitranna (without any raw mango) here. 

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